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Neglect woman sentenced following investigation

ODDIE: The image on the left shows one of the horses (Oddie) before being rescued. On the right, making good progress with recovery

ODDIE: The image on the left shows one of the horses (Oddie) before being rescued. On the right, making good progress with recovery

An Alford woman who neglected three horses has been banned from keeping the animals for two years following an investigation by the SSPCA.

Susan Gale, 56, of Tillyfour Court, Alford, was sentenced at Aberdeen

Sheriff Court on Tuesday (July 29).

At an earlier appearance, Gale pled guilty to failing to provide adequate nutrition and veterinary attention for her three horses, contrary to the Animal Health and Welfare (Scotland) Act 2006.

Gale was given a two year ban on keeping horses and a 90 hour community payback order, to be completed within nine months.

Commenting on the investigation and court case, Senior Inspector Alison

Simpson said: “When I arrived at Gale’s premises, the first horse I saw was a five year old coloured stallion named Oddie (pictured) and I was immediately concerned for his welfare. He was extremely thin, with all bones visible, and he had a body score of just 0.5 out of 5.

“The second horse, a 10 to 12 year old black mare named May, was also very underweight with a body score of 0.5. She had little co-ordination of her back legs due to a severe form of ataxia, which is a neurological disorder affecting balance, and she was suffering from a lice infestation.

“A third horse, an eight year old bay mare named April, was also thin, with a body score of one out of five.”

The SSPCA found no medical issues which would explain the poor body conditions of the horses, therefore it was clear this was due to a chronic lack of feed over a period of a few months.

Both April and May were suffering from serious heart murmurs and, after six months in SSPCA care, April had a severe heart attack.

The filly would not have been able to recover due to her physical state and the vet had to make the kindest decision to put her to sleep.

May’s heart murmur was affecting her quality of life and she was regularly losing balance and falling over.

The vet decided the most humane decision was to put may to sleep.

After prolonged rehabilitation, Oddie made a tremendous recovery and the SSPCA has since been able to find him “the loving new home he deserves.”

 

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