Funding for Parkinson’s research

Julie Jones's three-year research fellowship is being co-funded by Parkinson's UK Scotland and the Scottish Government
Julie Jones's three-year research fellowship is being co-funded by Parkinson's UK Scotland and the Scottish Government

An Aboyne man, diagnosed with Parkinson’s in 2014, has praised a specialist exercise as having a huge impact on his symptoms.

Chris Sebire says the benefits of attending physiotherapist Julie Jones’ classes in the village are “really noticeable”.

Julie is also a senior lecturer at Robert Gordon University and Parkinson’s UK Scotland and the Scottish Government are co-funding a £250,000 three-year research fellowship for her to identify which types of exercise deliver the best outcomes for people at every stage with the condition.

She has considerable experience in working with people who have Parkinson’s and played a central role in devising the Parkinson’s UK exercise framework that is used across the country.

The research will also develop a model that allows people to access the correct exercise at the right time.

Chris said: “For me the exercise class has been the most positive thing that I have been involved since being diagnosed with Parkinson’s.

“The exercises are challenging regardless of what level you can achieve. I look forward to every Friday morning and even do some of the exercises at home.

“It has definitely improved my physical and mental health.”

The charity is co-funding the research with the Chief Scientist’s Office.

Julie said: “This award from Parkinson’s UK and the Chief Scientist’s Office will allow me to explore the full range of benefits.

“As well as carrying out research I’ll be training physiotherapists and other allied health professionals to help them support people with Parkinson’s.

“That support will include how best to change people’s behaviour and motivation with regard to exercise.”